2014 in review (with some #putoutyourbats).

A lot can happen in a year. I find it helpful in the time between Christmas and new year to have a look back at all that happened in the last 12 months. To remember and reflect upon what might be done differently in the next 12 months.

As is true every year, some of what happened was very good, some was very sad and other things were downright awful. There are things to give thanks for, and others to pray about.

Here are a couple of compilations I’ve found around the place. My favourite, by far, is Marc Fennell’s.

Bring on 2015.
 

 

 

 
 

As a bonus, these are my three favourite photos from the past 12 months. #putoutyourbats

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Chappo’s contribution to the Anglican Diocese of Armidale

In 2014 (The 8th of November to be exact) the good people of the Anglican Diocese of Armidale celebrated their centenary. Before 1914, the Armidale Diocese existed as the Diocese of Grafton and Armidale, which covered a huge amount of New South Wales from 1867 till 1914. Over the past 100 years the Diocese has undergone massive change, and as part of my 4th year program at Moore Theological College I had the opportunity to do a large research project on the diocese. Specifically, I wanted to look into Chappo’s time in the diocese as I had hardly heard anything about his work there. What I found was deeply encouraging for my life and ministry. As the Armidale Diocese celebrates this weekend, feel free to get acquainted with our brothers and sisters of the north.

(note: forgive the [lack of] formatting with the footnotes. Also, this post is very long.)

Rev J Chapman

Introduction
John Chapman (1930-2012) was an evangelical Anglican clergyman who made a significant contribution to the ministry of the Diocese of Armidale between the years of 1951 to 1968. He was especially gifted in evangelism and used his skills in this area to bring many people into a saving relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ. While John is a much loved figure in the Australian church, many of the details regarding his time in the Diocese of Armidale are largely unknown as many people know him only because of his time working for the Department of Evangelism in Sydney. This essay explores his ministry in the Diocese of Armidale to show his contribution to the Diocese, and why the Diocese is regarded as being thoroughly evangelical today.

Early life and conversion
John Chapman was born in Oatley, NSW on 23 June, 1930.1 He was the son of Albury and Muriel Chapman and brother of Jim.2 Three doors from their family home was their home church, St Paul’s, Oatley. The description of home church is not entirely true for the whole family though. Muriel was a thoroughly converted woman who served in the church; on the other hand, Albury had huge problems with his perception that all the church did was take money from people who could not afford to give it.3 Despite this, John and Jim attended Sunday school regularly. This church would prove to be a significant launching pad for John’s trajectory into ministry. John was baptised at St Paul’s in September 1930, and he was confirmed at the age of 15 by William Hilliard, the Coadjutor Bishop of Sydney, on 20 April, 1945.4 Regarding John’s ministry in Armidale, Oatley was significant in another sense. Peter Chiswell also grew up on Rosa St. Though the Chiswells were not a churchgoing family, John and Peter would later work very closely together in the Diocese of Armidale where they developed an extraordinary ministry partnership as well as a lifelong friendship. Later, this friendship would have a great outworking in the furthering of the gospel in the Armidale Diocese.5

Oatley

Oatley

Conversion at High School
1946 held one of the most significant points in John’s life. Even though John regularly attended Sunday school, his conversion at the initial guiding of a high school colleague, Dick Tisher, and the school’s ISCF group would shape the rest of his life.6 7 John would go on to be properly converted at a Salvation Army camp at Collaroy.8 John and Dick attended Sutherland High School together, and Dick was the only individual in John’s class that he was aware of as being a Christian.9 With very little knowledge Dick convinced John bluntly that just because he was regular churchgoer, it did not mean that he was a Christian. This was something that John had assumed up until this point of his life, and at this point, he understood for the first time that he could not have been further away from Christianity.10 John remarked of this time that “I was a total pagan in every sense of the word. I behaved like a pagan, and I thought like a pagan, and that’s because I was a pagan”.11 What followed this realisation was that in 1946, John attended a youth camp fully with the intention that he would be converted at it. John was formally converted at the camp, and from that point he decided that for the rest of his life, it was his task “to do the Lord’s work, no matter what it was”.12

Youth leading at Oatley
After leaving high school in 1947, John went to train at Sydney Technical College to be a teacher. At this time, John also became involved in leading the youth group at Oatley. This involved running a regular fellowship group and taking his youth to camps that were run during school holidays at Chaldercot.13 This was a ministry in which John saw many conversions of the young people attending. In fact, there were so many conversions during each camp that he became completely convinced that through the plain preaching of the gospel there would be new converts at every camp. In his mind, this is what would happen, and he had no reason to think otherwise, because it always did. It was through this ministry that John became involved with Rev. Graham Delbridge.14 In 1951, Graham Delbridge, a thoroughly converted man, was the first youth director of the Diocese of Sydney.15 Delbridge was appointed to the role by Archbishop Mowll and was instrumental in setting up two campsites at Port Hacking, one of these being the Chaldercot site.16 Delbridge was a charismatic man, whose preaching was very entertaining.17 More importantly, he was a very fine evangelist.18 It was through this preaching that John and Graham would become acquainted, as Graham would preach at the camps at Chaldercot.19

Sydney Technical College, Ultimo

Sydney Technical College, Ultimo

Early exposure to the Diocese of Armidale
During the late 1940s, youth work in the Sydney Diocese was growing rapidly. This meant that by the 1950s the ministry was a well established spiritual force that did great work for the Diocese in the post-war years.20 The same was not true for the Diocese of Armidale. Where Sydney had established youth ministries, Armidale only had the murmurings of a few clergy that wished that they might have a similar kind of ministry to youth that existed in Sydney. One of the voices was that of Archdeacon Ian Stockdale, who wrote in 1951 to encourage the clergy to keep youth ministry as a priority, saying, “The Clergy must be awake to the urgency of the task of gaining the interest and the confidence of Youth. Many precious years have been wasted and many young people lost forever”.21 This note of encouragement, however, came after some activity had already begun. There were at least twelve youth groups operating in the Armidale Diocese during 1951, though these groups operated completely independently of each other.22

Due to the success of his ministry to youth in Sydney, Graham Delbridge was a man with many good connections among the various youth leaders in the Sydney Diocese. One outworking of this was that the various youth workers from all over Sydney and the youth they led were to meet for a combined youth department house party over the 1951 Easter weekend.23 These house parties were run quite regularly throughout the year, and the focus was always on evangelism. It was an uncomfortable conversation with a young girl at one of these weekends that caused John to write “Know and Tell the Gospel”.24

Bingara

Bingara

When Delbridge received a request from the vicar of Bingara, John Wagstaff, to send help to run the first Diocese-wide youth camp, he could not have possibly understood the impact his decision would make for the cause of the gospel in the Armidale Diocese. Delbridge decided that John Chapman would not be coming to the house party, instead he sent sent John, along with Allen Quee, to Armidale to run the camp.25 At the camp, though only five of the parishes were represented, this did not stop the event from being declared “a great success”.26 So great was the success that another camp was run at Gunnedah in October that same year, with a follow up being run at Bingara over the Easter weekend of 1952, with around 90 youth attending.27 This period was a bitter sweet time in the youth work of the Diocese. The Diocese appointed a dedicated Youth Director, a young lady named Effie Sourry.28 Effie had a Greek Orthodox background, which Bishop John Moyes did not have a problem with. While her appointment was heralded as great progress, for unrelated reasons one of the biggest encouragers of youth work in the Diocese, John Wagstaff, left the Diocese to much regret.29

These camps at Bingara and Gunnedah were John’s first experience of not only country ministry, but the country itself. The trips of 1951 to the country were formative for John on many counts. After he finished at teachers college, he was bound to serve in the Department of Education for a number of years. Being a Christian at the time of entering his bond, he did not see a way that he, in good conscience, could get out of his obligation to the Department. So changed was he by the contacts that he made in the Diocese of Armidale, he decided that there was only one solution. John applied to be sent to work in the Diocese, specifically in the Tamworth area, as a manual arts teacher.30

John’s request was granted and during the next few years (1952-1955) he worked in Manilla, Tamworth and Gunnedah teaching woodwork.31 Manilla was a difficult place for John to live as there was no existing evangelical ministry there. One of the tactics of the Bishop was to send the evangelical men to the far outposts of the Diocese.32 It should be noted that there were a number of evangelicals in the Diocese who were not from Moore College. Armidale had the tradition of accepting graduates from St John’s Theological College, Morpeth and while they could be broadly described as “high-churchmen” there were a number of men who would be described as evangelical. John Dowe was an example of an evangelical from Morpeth who was sent to an outpost, just as the majority of Moore College men had been.33 Regardless of this, John was soon a member of the youth council of the Diocese. Over the course of the next few years, John would also become a parish counsellor, a choir leader and a lay reader in the Anglican church in Gunnedah.34

Allen Quee, the man whom John ran the first Diocese youth camps with, eventually went to work with the Church Missionary Society as the General Secretary of South Australia.35 This is a path in which John nearly made himself when his obligation to the Department of Education ended. In 1956, he was approached by CMS to see if he would be able to take up a position as the headmaster of a school in North Borneo.36 John’s work as a school teacher around Tamworth, and the influence it had on him meant that he had to decline their invitation. The lack of evangelical ministry in the Diocese was difficult for John because he saw the great need for the gospel to be preached. The experience of ministry in the country was so different from what he had experienced in Sydney, and the need was so great for the gospel in the Diocese, that John applied for Moore College and commenced his studies there in 1957. Given John’s newly found convictions for gospel preaching, he understood that he could no longer be involved in the ministry on a part time basis. Instead, he recognised the potential if he was involved in the work on a full time basis. So along with enrolling in college, he also sought candidacy in the Armidale Diocese. On the 7th January, 1957 Bishop Moyes confirmed that he had accepted John as a candidate for Armidale and that John’s college fees of £150pa would be paid.37

Screenshot 2014-11-07 21.48.41

Moore College, 1957
In 1956 John returned to Sydney and taught at East Hills Boys High School. One year earlier he had made contact with Peter Chiswell, while Peter was working in the Diocese of Armidale as a civil engineer.38 Even though they had lived on the same street in Oatley growing up, they had not had close contact until then.39 They became the best of friends while at college, and John instigated initial contact between Peter and Bishop Moyes in 1956 regarding ministry in the Diocese.40 This influence would be a factor in many others seeking to be ordained in Armidale. John’s influence convinced Ray Smith to seek acceptance as an Armidale candidate, and he also tried to introduce Deacon Norman Lawless of Wollongong to the Bishop. Despite this introduction, Lawless would not end up in the Diocese.41

When John first moved to Manilla, he began a Licentiate of Theology by correspondence, so when he arrived at Moore College it was with the view to finish the requirements of the course over the next two years. He studied Greek 1 in 1957, and then was expected to study for another year, though this did not occur. It is not entirely clear as to the reasons why, though it is possible that a request by Ian Stockdale for John to go an work with him in Armidale was the reason.42 43 John found being at Moore College difficult. He spoke of his decision to leave Moore College as being a positive thing, as well as something that was in God’s plan.44 John’s unexpectedly early conclusion to his studies was not a problem for Bishop Moyes as he stated that “I realise that you are 27 years of age, mature in your thinking, and having years in college both the Sydney Teachers College and now Moore College, I cannot but think that you have sufficient background to allow for ordination”.45 At this news, plans were made, and John was ordained as a deacon by Bishop Moyes on 21st December, 1957 in Armidale.46 47

John Stoward Moyes

John Stoward Moyes

Relationship with Bishop Moyes
Bishop John Stoward Moyes served as the Bishop of Armidale for 35 years from 1929 till his retirement in 1964.48 He is the longest serving Bishop in the Diocese since its creation in 1914. Moyes was a moderate high-churchman with an evangelistic heart due to his appreciation for the evangelical tradition in the Church of England.49 He was highly critical of communism,50 and was also a supporter of the social gospel due to his exposure to the extreme wealth and poverty during his work in Lewisham in South East London.51 This meant that he had a vision where Christian ethics was the solution to the social problems of the time. He was originally from Adelaide and he had been involved in running “Christ-centered but cross-less missions” during this time.52 Moyes did not preach substitutionary atonement and he viewed the primary role of ministers as priests of the Word and Sacrament. He held a ”receptionist” view of the Sacraments, where reception of the elements was in some way equated with receiving Christ Himself.

On the whole, John’s relationship with the Bishop was excellent. Moyes respected John for his ability to work with youth, in addition to this, Moyes recognised that John was a gifted leader and evangelist. Because of this, Moyes kept John close with the hope of making “him a little more balanced” in his approach to ministry.53 During John’s year at Moore College, John and the Bishop wrote to each other frequently. Their letters to each other were mostly warm encouragements, while also giving updates on the ministry in the Armidale region.54 The two men would also regulary mention that they were in constant prayer for each other as they worked in their respective contexts.55 Just prior to John’s 1957 ordination, the Bishop awarded John the A.E. James scholarship, which consisted of a £25 cheque to be spent on books and training in the area of evangelism.56 Moyes held the view that certain people were classified as true evangelists. His belief, however, was one that devalued the role of the laity in evangelism. This was a view that John countered in his acceptance letter where he stated that he had been reading some material by John Stott on the topic of evangelism, and that he had been convinced that evangelism was not something for clergy to work in alone, but the laity had an integral role in the work of evangelism also.57 This was a subtle disagreement, and their relationship continued to flourish afterwards nevertheless.

Screenshot 2014-11-07 21.36.34

Moree and curacy
For some time, Moyes had been concerned that the church was dying, as exemplified by various scandals amongst the clergy surrounding issues such as alcohol and gambling. One of these such cases involved the vicar of Moree, Edward Thomas Ormerod.58 He had been accused of consuming alcohol and partaking in gambling by some of the local parishioners. It is not clear if these claims were proven. Regardless, the accusations forced Moyes to remove Ormerod from Moree. In his place, Archdeacon Ian Stockdale was moved from Gunnedah to be the new vicar of Moree in 1958.59 To fix the dwindling numbers in the churches, Moyes “sought to import Moore College trained graduates in order to see growth”, but understanding their predisposition to do things in the manner in which they had been trained, he also sought to “shape them to be churchmen” as well.60 When Moyes first flagged the idea of Moree with Ian Stockdale, Stockdale indicated that he would not go without gaining some support on the ground. Moyes’ desire to see growth through the new evangelical curates, and the desire of Stockdale for some help, culminated in John being sent to work with Stockdale in Moree.61 John and the Stockdales had already had close contact during his work as a teacher in Gunnedah, they enjoyed a great friendship together which continued through John’s time at college 62 and was strengthened during the 1959 Billy Graham crusade.

All Saints, Moree

All Saints, Moree

In 1959, Peter Chiswell, who was also a candidate for Armidale, did not have a parish to go to. With this problem, Moyes sent Peter to Moree to work with Stockdale and John for two months.63 This close working contact formed a ministry partnership that would ultimately see the trajectory of the Diocese changed most dramatically through the 1964 synod that elected Clive Kerle as Bishop.

1959 would not only be significant for John’s friendship with Peter Chiswell. During the previous year, Ian Stockdale suffered a heart attack and was on sick leave for some time. While he was on leave, plans were being made for the first Billy Graham crusade to commence on the 15th February. Bishop Moyes had encouraged the parishes of his Diocese to sponsor landlines so that the Crusade could make an impact in the Diocese.64 This encouragement was not needed in Moree because the Ministers Fraternal had approached John and Peter, who were in charge while Stockdale was on leave, to enquire if the church hall at Moree could host the landline as it was the largest building in the town.65 John thought that hosting the landline was the right thing to do, so he granted them their request. When Stockdale returned from leave, he did not know what needed to be done in preparation: Stockdale had no experience in running evangelistic events, though John did from his time at the Youth Department house parties with Graham Delbridge. John suggested that a group should meet to pray, so they met every morning at 7am for that purpose. From this prayer group, John thought it would be good to train counsellors to assist and give advice to people who had committed their life to Christ during the Crusade. These training courses were run on Wednesday evenings and consisted of vinyl recordings of Charlie Riggs.66 One of the most amazing things would happen during the first training session. Riggs explained that you could not led people to Christ if you had not accepted Christ yourself. That night, at the age of 60, Ian Stockdale was converted. This led to the conversion of his wife, Catriona, during the crusade as well as many other people from Moree over the coming weeks.67

Ian Stockdale became one of the biggest encouragers of John’s work in the Diocese, and they would remain friends even though 1960 saw John leave the parish of Moree for Armidale to become the Director of Youth Ministry under the careful watch of Bishop Moyes.68

Director of Youth Ministry and Christian Education
In 1958 there was already some degree of coordinated youth ministry happening under the supervision of Youth Director, Effie Sourry. The work of youth ministry was growing and Effie travelled around the Diocese providing training to the leaders of the groups. Despite her hard work, there were still problems associated with getting the volunteers to attend these sessions to gain training.69 In one of these trips in 1957 to Gunnedah, she met Peter Robin Jackson-Calway, they fell in love and were married in Armidale in September, 1959. After their wedding they moved to Sydney.70 Effie’s resignation was a shock to the Diocese, though they were very thankful for her work in getting youthwork “on its feet”.71 This left a hole in the work of Youth Ministry, a hole that was almost perfectly suited to John, his skills and convictions. Moyes had a policy of promoting people who had a proven history in saving souls, so given John’s history, he was appointed as the new Youth Director. John came in to the role with lots of enthusiasm and energy which brought new life to the ministry.72 John’s work as Youth Director was one of “Constant Activity” as he travelled the length and breadth of the Diocese speaking and training youth leaders, Sunday school leaders, scripture teachers and running many camps.73 These camps on the whole were a great success, though the camp held at Keepit Dam in 1964 was disappointing with only 40 youth attending.74 In many ways this was a continuation of work that was already taking place before his appointment, though John did start some new things. One of these things was that John broadened his focus not just to senior youth, but he instigated the first camp for juniors75 in 1960 with the aim of developing good Christian character in them.76 John also conducted children’s missions at the cathedral in Tamworth in the week before Easter that were very successful.77 In Moyes’ opinion, “Miss Effie Sourry … [laid a] good foundation and a fine organisation has been built upon under the capable and incomparable leadership of the Rev. John Chapman”.78

Keepit Dam

Keepit Dam

John had been so successful in His ministry to young people that in 1966 his role was expanded to include work with adults. This was a change in his role, though it was also a formal expression of work that he and the previous youth director had already been actively involved in.79 John was now the Director of Christian Education.80 This was a role that he held until he left the Diocese in 1968 to work for the Board of Diocesan Missions in Sydney.

1964 synod to elect Clive Kerle as Bishop
When John was ordained in the Diocese there were very few evangelicals involved in ministry there. The clergy were largely broad churchmen. Often trained at Morpeth College, these men practised what might be described as middle church Anglicanism. In their ministry practice, the Bible was not the sole authority in matters of faith, and various Catholic elements remained in their church practice. Ray Smith described them as “nothings”; they were neither Roman Catholic nor Evangelical.81 During this period, the parish of Glenn Innes, under the leadership of Cliff Rotherow, was the Anglo-Catholic centre of the Diocese, where it remained one of the last strongholds of Anglo-Catholicism in the region. Despite rejecting the complete Roman doctrine of transubstantiation, this parish held to a eucharistic sacrifice model of the Lord’s Supper.

Holy Trinity, Glen Innes

Holy Trinity, Glen Innes

During John’s ministry in the Diocese, he regularly tried to bring other evangelicals into the Diocese. This happened through the influence of John on Bishop Moyes. Moyes had little success in reforming John, instead John earned the respect of the Bishop to the point where Moyes listened to and respected John’s recommendations for new appointments.82 This would be a significant factor in changing the trajectory of the Diocese.

Bishop Moyes’ retirement in 1964 brought a special synod to elect a new Bishop. There were two candidates in the final vote, John Munro, from Dee Why and John Rymer, from the University of New England.83 Sydney’s assistant Bishop Clive Kerle was asked to agree to nomination, but he declined. The synod ended in deadlock with neither man able to secure the majority of the vote, synod was adjourned and would meet again on 22nd September, 1964. For this second special synod, Peter Chiswell, Ian Stockdale and John had convinced Clive Kerle to allow his name to be put forward as a candidate for the second vote. He agreed, and he gained the majority of the vote in both houses after a shrewd political campaign run by the three Armidale men.84 85 The evangelicals that had been brought into the Diocese during John’s time did not have the numbers on their own to bring the vote they wanted. As a long serving clergyman in the Diocese, Ian Stockdale was in the unique position where he could exert his influence among the moderate churchmen in encouraging them to vote for Kerle. With this encouragement from Stockdale, Clive Kerle’s election as bishop occurred through a combined Evangelical block vote with the support of moderate churchmen.86 The combined vote of the evangelicals and moderate churchmen elected the first thoroughly evangelical Bishop of Armidale.87 Sydney was very sad that they were losing a hardworking and much loved gospel worker, but the way was made for huge change in the Armidale Diocese.88 Kerle was installed as Bishop on February 25, 1965.89

Screenshot 2014-11-07 21.41.16

Ongoing legacy
During of the election of Clive Kerle, the private hatred that many of the senior clergy had for John became public. He was unfailing in his determination to see the gospel spread throughout the Diocese because he was so confident in God’s ability to work. Naturally this caused ripples to form. Many of the clergy were not happy about the way things were changing, particularly an increase of men from Moore College being appointed to positions in the Diocese. Furthermore, the senior clergy were unimpressed that Bishop Moyes was seemingly unaware that any change was occurring. John knew that he was unaware and continued to invite more men to the Diocese.90

One of the biggest problems the senior clergy had with John was his expression of conservative evangelicalism. The practical outworking of this involved “biblical preaching, preaching for gospel conversion, and pastoring with a view to Christian growth”.91 John’s vision for his work in the Diocese was chiefly of an evangelist; “to see people turn to Christ – to be converted”.92 He was concerned for the growth of the Christians, but this was not his major focus. It is important to recognise that in his evangelical convictions, John was not alone. Peter Chiswell, Ray Smith and many of the other Moore College graduates had the same convictions. This meant that this group of like minded men needed someone to led them. John had recruited many of them for work in the Diocese, so he was the natural centre point for the group. Ray Smith remembers that John did not just recruit people, but he invested lots of time training and in keeping in touch with his evangelical colleagues. In this respect, John was like a bishop of the evangelicals in Armidale; he made sure that they were all equipped evangelistically.93 Many of the senior clergy could not stand what was happening to the Diocese and over the coming years they would resign.94 This only helped the evangelical cause, as these senior clergy were replaced by evangelicals.95 This meant that while there were only a handful of evangelicals in 1958, by the time 1965 came, Ray Smith estimates that 40-45% of the clergy might be described as evangelical.96

John’s influence and the changes that came out of Kerle’s election were not looked upon favourably by the national church. When John left the Diocese for Sydney, there was much anxiety among the senior clergy of the Sydney Diocese because they were worried that they would soon have an Armidale-type situation on their hands. Marcus Loane, jokingly, said to John on his arrival in Sydney, “I’ve got enough problems here already, I don’t need you stirring up trouble”.97 While there was anxiety in Sydney, there was much sadness in Armidale. John had been at the centre of everything good that had happened in the Diocese of Armidale and his friends and the Diocese were naturally upset to see him leave.98

Peter Chiswell

Peter Chiswell

John was farewelled by the Diocese at St Peters, South Tamworth at 6:30pm on 14th September, 1968.99 He left a lasting legacy, especially in the way he modelled biblical preaching, focused on evangelism, and reorganised the work of the Department of Christian Education. In addition, John left a lasting impression on two of the men he had brought to the Diocese.100 Ray Smith was soon promoted and became the new director of the Department of Christian Education, while Peter Chiswell, in 1976, succeeded Clive Kerle to become the second evangelical Bishop of Armidale.101 Ian Stockdale continued to work in the Diocese for sometime, and was now a thoroughly converted man in contrast to the man John met as a teacher sixteen years earlier. The Diocese would maintain its affection for John over the years, and he was welcomed back to the Diocese in 2008 to once again preach the gospel.102

Screenshot 2014-11-07 21.43.27

Through God working through the diligence of a humble Christian man called John Chapman, many people in the Diocese of Armidale came to know the Lord. During his time, and the time since he was in Armidale, his strong evangelical convictions, along with other likeminded ministers, led to the point where today the Diocese is regarded as being thoroughly evangelical. John Chapman’s contribution to the Diocese of Armidale was one that brought the gospel of Jesus Christ to some people for the first time. He also made the training of the laity for ministry a priority. In turn, God caused much growth for His kingdom as people turned to Him as their saviour and were equipped for more ministry.

All glory and thanks be to God.

Footnotes

1 John Chapman, ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’, July 9, 1956.
2 Michael Orpwood, Chappo: for the sake of the gospel: John Chapman and the Department of Evangelism (Russell Lea, Australia: Eagleswift Press, 1995), 2; ‘Thanksgiving for the Life and Ministry of Canon John Charles Chapman’ (St Andrews Cathedral, Sydney, November 24, 2012), 8, Online: http://www.sydneycathedral.com/sites/default/files/files/Order%20of%20Service%20-%20John%20Chapman.pdf.
3 Orpwood, 7.
4 Chapman, ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’; Janet West, ‘HILLIARD, William George (1887-1961)’, Australian Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, Online: http://webjournals.ac.edu.au/journals/adeb/h_/hilliard-william-george-1887-1961/.
5 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’, February 18, 2014; Orpwood, 8.
6 Orpwood, 9; Chapman, ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’.
7 Dick Tisher was later the president of the Sydney University Evangelical Union
8 Orpwood, 11.
9 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’, 2012, Online: https://vimeo.com/44097034.
10 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
11 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
12 Chapman, ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’.
13 Chaldercot is a conference site in the Royal National Park, Sydney, NSW. It is still a functioning conference site operated by Youthworks.
14 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
15 Marcus L. Loane, Mark These Men: A Brief Account of Some Evangelical Clergy in the Diocese of Sydney who Were Associated with ArchBishop Mowll (Acorn Press, Limited, 1985), 92.
16 Brian Dickey, ‘DELBRIDGE, Graham Richard (1917-1980)’, Australian Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, Online: http://webjournals.ac.edu.au/journals/adeb/d_/delbridge-graham-richard-1917-1980/.
17 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
18 ‘Interview by Gavin Perkins with John Chapman’, March 19, 2010.
19 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
20 Loane, 92.
21 Diocesan Registry Armidale, ‘Youth for the church’, The Armidale Diocese News, June 1951, 19.
22 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1951, 48.
23 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
24 Chapman, Know and Tell the Gospel, 9.
25 Paul Lamb, The conscience of the church: John Stoward Moyes, Bishop of Armidale, 1929-1964 (Gundaroo, NSW: Published for the Diocese of Armidale by Brolga Press, 1997), 193.
26 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1951, 48.
27 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1952, 28; Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1953, 32.
28 ‘Effie Sourry — An extraordinary story’, Armidale Independent, June 29, 2011, Online: http://Armidale.starcommunity.com.au/community-news/2011-06-29/effie-sourry-an-extraordinary-story/.
29 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1953, 32.
30 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
31 Chapman, ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’.
32 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
33 Private correspondence with Tony McCarthy
34 Chapman, ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’.
35 Mark Hadley, ‘CMS General Secretary on the street’, Sydney Anglicans, Online: http://sydneyanglicans.net/news/cms_general_secretary_on_the_street.
36 Chapman, ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’.
37 ‘Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 7th January 1957’.
38 Orpwood, 24.
39 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
40 ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 12th June 1956’; ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 24th June 1956’; ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 10th July 1956’.
41 Kenneth Cable, ‘Cable Clerical Index’, ed by. Leoni Cable, September 9, 2012, sec. Lawless, Norman Henry, Online: http://anglicanhistory.org/aus/cci/; Orpwood, 29; ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 26th October 1957’; ‘Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 30th October 1957’; ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 2nd November 1957’.
42 Private correspondence with Ray Smith
43 There is a letter outlining the exact reason for John leaving from Moore College from Bishop John Moyes, however it could not be located.
44 ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 2nd December 1957’; ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
45 ‘Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 27th November 1957’.
46 Private correspondence with Ray Smith
47 Lamb, 243.
48 ‘Centenary of the Anglican Diocese of Armidale’, The Armidale Express, February 10, 1969, 13.
49 Ray Smith notes that ‘today we would call him a high church evangelical’.
50 John S. Moyes, ‘Providence, Power and Politics: A charge delivered to the first session of the Thirty-First Synod of the Diocese of Armidale’ (Cathedral Church of St. Peter, Armidale, New South Wales, February 18, 1962).
51 Paul Terracini, ‘Bishop John Moyes vs Robert Menzies on Banning Communism & the Vietnam War’, The Sydney Institute, Online: http://www.thesydneyinstitute.com.au/podcast/Bishop-john-moyes-vs-robert-menzies-on-banning-communism-the-vietnam-war/.
52 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
53 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
54 ‘Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 12th April 1957’.
55 ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 8th March 1957’.
56 ‘Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 9th December 1957’.
57 ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 15th December 1957’; John R. W. Stott, Parochial Evangelism by the Laity (London Diocesan Conference, 1956).
58 Cable, sec. Ormerod, Edward Thomas.
59 Cable, sec. Reginald Ian Henry Stockdale.
60 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
61 Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1958, 7; ‘Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 27th November 1957’.
62 ‘Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 18th November 1957’.
63 ‘Letter from Bishop John Moyes to Peter Chiswell dated 28th November 1957’; Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1958, 8; Council of the Diocese of Armidale, ‘The Link, December 1996’, 3.
64 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
65 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
66 Riggs was the director of counseling and follow-up for the Billy Graham crusades.
67 ‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’.
68 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1960; Ian Stockdale, ‘Veritas: Magazine of the Diocesan Youth Council’, September 1963.
69 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1958, 33.
70 ‘Effie Sourry — An extraordinary story’.
71 Lamb, 242.
72 Council of the Diocese of Armidale, ‘The Link, September 1960’, 30; Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1961, 30.
73 ‘Interview by Gavin Perkins with John Chapman’; Council of the Diocese of Armidale, ‘The Link, September 1961’.
74 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1963, 42; Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1964, 45; Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1965, 29.
75 Juniors were classified as 5th class in primary school to 5th year at high school.
76 St Peter’s Cathedral, Tamworth, ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, August 1960’.
77 St Peter’s Cathedral, Tamworth, ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, May 1960’; St Peter’s Cathedral, Tamworth, ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, May 1963’.
78 Lamb, 244.
79 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1966, 28.
80 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1967, 6.
81 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
82 Phillip Jensen and Sam Freney, ‘Majoring on the majors’, March 25, 2013, Online: http://matthiasmedia.com/briefing/2013/03/interview-majoring-on-the-majors/.
83 ‘Papers from the Bishop Election Synod, 11th August 1964’.
84 Jensen and Freney.
85 ‘Papers from the Bishop Election Synod, 22nd September 1964’; ‘Rt. Rev. R. C. Kerle To Be Armidale’s New Bishop?’, Armidale Express, September 23, 1964; ‘Sees Succession to Bishop Moyes as “Great Privilege”’, Armidale Express, September 25, 1964.
86 Private correspondence with Ray Smith
87 Jensen and Freney.
88 Hugh Rowlands Gough, ‘Presidential Address to Sydney Diocesan Synod — October 12th 1964’, 234–235; Hugh Rowlands Gough, ‘Presidential Address to Sydney Diocesan Synod — October 11th 1965’, 263.
89 John Farrell, ‘The year that was: 1964. Kerle named new Bishop’, Armidale Express, September 8, 2004.
90 Lamb, 340.
91 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
92 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
93 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
94 Lamb, 342.
95 Jensen and Freney.
96 ‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’.
97 Jensen and Freney.
98 Council of the Diocese of Armidale, ‘The Link, September 1968’.
99 St Peter’s Cathedral, Tamworth, ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, August 1968’.
100 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1969, 34.
101 Diocesan Registry Armidale, Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1970, 4.
102 ‘Pearls of Wisdom at St Peter’s’, Armidale Express, February 29, 2008; Council of the Diocese of Armidale, ‘The Link, June 2008’; John Chapman, Making the Most of the Rest of Your Life (Matthias Media, 2007).

Bibliography

Cable, Kenneth. ‘Cable Clerical Index’. Edited by Leoni Cable, September 9, 2012. Online: http://anglicanhistory.org/aus/cci/.

‘Centenary of the Anglican Diocese of Armidale’. The Armidale Express, February 10, 1969.

Chapman, John. ‘Diocese of Armidale. Questions for candidates for Holy orders.’, July 9, 1956.

_____. Know and Tell the Gospel. Matthias Media, 1998.

_____. Making the Most of the Rest of Your Life. Matthias Media, 2007.

Council of the Diocese of Armidale. ‘The Link, December 1996’.

_____. ‘The Link, June 2008’.

_____. ‘The Link, September 1960’.

_____. ‘The Link, September 1961’.

_____. ‘The Link, September 1968’.

Dickey, Brian. ‘DELBRIDGE, Graham Richard (1917-1980)’. Australian Dictionary of Evangelical Biography. Online: http://webjournals.ac.edu.au/journals/adeb/d_/delbridge-graham-richard-1917-1980/.

Diocesan Registry Armidale. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1951.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1952.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1953.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1958.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1960.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1961.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1963.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1964.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1965.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1966.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1967.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1969.

_____. Year Book of the Diocese of Armidale, 1970.

_____. ‘Youth for the church’. The Armidale Diocese News, June 1951.

‘Effie Sourry — An extraordinary story’. Armidale Independent, June 29, 2011. Online: http://Armidale.starcommunity.com.au/community-news/2011-06-29/effie-sourry-an-extraordinary-story/.

Farrell, John. ‘The year that was: 1964. Kerle named new Bishop’. Armidale Express, September 8, 2004.

Gough, Hugh Rowlands. ‘Presidential Address to Sydney Diocesan Synod — October 11th 1965’.

_____. ‘Presidential Address to Sydney Diocesan Synod — October 12th 1964’.

Hadley, Mark. ‘CMS General Secretary on the street’. Sydney Anglicans. Online: http://sydneyanglicans.net/news/cms_general_secretary_on_the_street.

‘Interview by Gavin Perkins with John Chapman’, March 19, 2010.

‘Interview by Kurt Langmead and Tim Stevens with Ray Smith’, February 18, 2014.

‘Interview by Richard Chin with John Chapman’, 2012. Online: https://vimeo.com/44097034.

Jensen, Phillip, and Sam Freney. ‘Majoring on the majors’, March 25, 2013. Online: http://matthiasmedia.com/briefing/2013/03/interview-majoring-on-the-majors/.

Lamb, Paul. The conscience of the church: John Stoward Moyes, Bishop of Armidale, 1929-1964. Gundaroo, NSW: Published for the Diocese of Armidale by Brolga Press, 1997.

Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 12th April 1957.

Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 27th November 1957.

Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 30th October 1957.

Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 7th January 1957.

Letter from Bishop John Moyes to John Chapman dated 9th December 1957.

Letter from Bishop John Moyes to Peter Chiswell dated 28th November 1957.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 10th July 1956.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 12th June 1956.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 15th December 1957.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 18th November 1957.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 24th June 1956.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 26th October 1957.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 2nd December 1957.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 2nd November 1957.

Letter from John Chapman to Bishop John Moyes dated 8th March 1957.

Loane, Marcus L. Mark These Men: A Brief Account of Some Evangelical Clergy in the Diocese of Sydney who Were Associated with Archbishop Mowll. Acorn Press, Limited, 1985.

Moyes, John S. ‘Providence, Power and Politics: A charge delivered to the first session of the Thirty-First Synod of the Diocese of Armidale’. Cathedral Church of St. Peter, Armidale, New South Wales, February 18, 1962.

Orpwood, Michael. Chappo: for the sake of the gospel: John Chapman and the Department of Evangelism. Russell Lea, Australia: Eagleswift Press, 1995.

‘Papers from the Bishop Election Synod, 11th August 1964’.

‘Papers from the Bishop Election Synod, 22nd September 1964’.

‘Pearls of Wisdom at St Peter’s’. Armidale Express, February 29, 2008.

‘Rt. Rev. R. C. Kerle To Be Armidale’s New Bishop?’. Armidale Express, September 23, 1964.

‘Sees Succession to Bishop Moyes as “Great Privilege”’. Armidale Express, September 25, 1964.

St Peter’s Cathedral, Tamworth. ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, August 1960’.

_____. ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, August 1968’.

_____. ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, May 1960’.

_____. ‘The Fisherman: Monthly paper of the Cathedral Parish of St Peter, May 1963’.

Stockdale, Ian. ‘Veritas: Magazine of the Diocesan Youth Council’, September 1963.

Stott, John R. W. Parochial Evangelism by the Laity. London Diocesan Conference, 1956.

Terracini, Paul. ‘Bishop John Moyes vs Robert Menzies on Banning Communism & the Vietnam War’. The Sydney Institute. Online: http://www.thesydneyinstitute.com.au/podcast/Bishop-john-moyes-vs-robert-menzies-on-banning-communism-the-vietnam-war/.

‘Thanksgiving for the Life and Ministry of Canon John Charles Chapman’. St Andrews Cathedral, Sydney, November 24, 2012. Online: http://www.sydneycathedral.com/sites/default/files/files/Order%20of%20Service%20-%20John%20Chapman.pdf.

West, Janet. ‘HILLIARD, William George (1887-1961)’. Australian Dictionary of Evangelical Biography. Online: http://webjournals.ac.edu.au/journals/adeb/h_/hilliard-william-george-1887-1961/.

Christmas Carols. TwentyThirteen edition.

I once wrote about how I don’t really get Christmas Carols.

You might be happy to know that as I have grown (slightly) older I have also become less grinch like. Even relishing the yearly opportunity that Christmas provides to go hunting for new versions of timeless classics.

Here is what I’m listening to this year.

North Point Christmas

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Picks: Do you hear, He Has Come for Us (God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen) & Angels We Have Heard On High.

North Point Christmas: Let There Be Light

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Picks: Hallelujah, Unto Us & I Heard The Bells.

Evan Wickham: Christmas Music Vol. 1

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Picks: Angels We Have Heard on High, End of Exile & Hark! The Herald Angels Sing!

Josh Gilligan: Christmas EP

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Picks: O Holy Night.

Do you know of anything else that I should be listening to?